Notre Campus LEED-Certified Buildings

In 2008, Notre Dame adopted a sustainable buildings policy that requires all new construction be built to LEED standards. Since then, the mission has been to achieve no less than LEED Silver for each new or newly renovated construction project on campus. Part of achieving LEED certifications, Notre Dame has accomplished a 96% diversion rate for all construction project waste.  Below are the building projects in which Notre Dame received LEED-certification and are listed in the order LEED-certification was received.

  • Geddes Hall

    Opened July 2009
    (65,000 GSF)
    LEED Gold Certified

    Features include motion sensor lighting, a shower and changing room for bicyclists, bamboo-lined walls in the chapel and coffeehouse, recycled cork flooring in the lobby, and regionally-sourced, recycled-content steel, gypsum, and concrete. Overall, the building performs at approximately 40% greater energy efficiency than required by code. For more information, read Geddes Hall receives LEED Gold Certification.

  • Ryan Hall

    Opened August 2009
    (72,000 GSF)
    LEED Gold Certified

    Over 200 women reside in Ryan Hall, Notre Dame’s first LEED certified residence hall. The building was oriented to the site taking into consideration the location of windows for natural light penetration to the interior of the building. Features include regional, recycled content gypsum and steel along with a reflective white membrane roof. Energy-saving mechanicals such as variable-frequency drive pumps for heating hot water and HVAC mechanicals with greater monitoring capabilities all add to the efficiency of the building. Overall, the building performs at approximately 25% greater energy efficiency than required by code. For more information, read Ryan Hall receives LEED Gold..

  • Leighton Hall at Innovation Park

    Opened Fall 2009
    (54,000 GSF)
    LEED Silver Certified

    The well-insulated building envelope in combination with highly efficient mechanical and electrical systems create a building that resulted in an expected energy savings of 17% beyond code. The building features exhaust heat recovery, demountable walls, motion sensor-controlled lighting and HVAC systems, as well as locally sourced material and 100% Forest Stewardship Council certified wood. For more information, read Innovation Park Earns LEED Silver..

  • Purcell Pavilion

    Opened October 2009
    (47,000 GSF)
    LEED Gold Certified

    Purcell Pavilion's addition and retrofit was designed to be 21% more energy efficient than a baseline model depicted by a conventional design approach. In addition to saving approximately 469,000 kilowatt hours annually (the equivalent of taking 63 passenger cars off the road) the long-life span of LED light bulbs will virtually eliminate maintenance costs and will save the University approximately $350,000 in energy costs each year. The project was constructed with more than 20% locally sourced materials and during the construction process 1,246 tons (83%) of the construction waste was diverted from the landfill. 6% of the building materials used consisted of post-consumer and pre-consumer recycled content. The building also achieves a high standard of water efficiency by utilizing low flow urinals, faucets and shower heads, and dual flush low-flow toilets. For more information, read Purcell Pavilion receives LEED Gold..

  • Stinson-Remick Hall

    Opened January 2010
    (163,500 GSF)
    LEED Gold Certified

    The new College of Engineering facility is 13% to 15% more efficient than code as a result of efficiency technologies including heat reclamation from exhaust air, cooling of clean rooms using outside air in winter, occupancy controlled lighting and HVAC, high-efficiency lighting, and electricity and heating from a micro-turbine. The roof has a photovoltaic solar array that produces 30kw of electricity for the building as well as a white roof membrane installed to reduce the heating load on the building in the summer months. Over 75 electrical metering points track the building’s electrical usage. For more information, read Stinson-Remick receives LEED Gold..

  • Carole Sandner Hall: Alliance for Catholic Education

    Opened May 2011
    (29,550 GSF)
    LEED Gold Certified

    The new home of the Alliance for Catholic Education saves 172,000 kWh per year in electrical energy use versus a conventionally designed building. The building uses 60% less water and its irrigation system uses 59% less water than a traditional irrigation system design. 97% of the construction debris was diverted from landfill. One-quarter of the building’s nonmechanical systems were constructed using recycled materials and almost a third of the building’s nonmechanical systems were produced within 500 miles of the building. The building utilizes a fully integrated lighting control system that is capable of programming occupied hours to automatically shut off the lights during nonbusiness hours. Light fixtures automatically dim or grow brighter as the amount of sunlight increases or decreases in a particular space. For more information, read Carole Sandner Hall receives LEED Gold certification.

  • Compton Family Ice Arena

    Opened October 2011
    (203,000 GSF)
    LEED Silver Certified

    The landscaping around the Compton Family Ice Arena is a beautiful example of native plant landscaping. Native plantings adapt to the local climate, soil types, and animals better than non-native plantings. Native plants have also developed a natural defense against diseases and pests, which helps reduce maintenance costs and requires less pesticide use.

  • Stayer Center for Executive Education

    Opened March 2013
    (55,000 GSF)
    LEED Silver Certified

  • Morris Inn Expansion and Renovation

    Opened August 2013
    (137,500 GSF)
    LEED Gold Certified

    Originally opened in 1952, the Morris Inn underwent an extensive renovation and expansion during Summer 2013. The new Morris Inn features a heat recovery system, LED lighting in many areas throughout the building, and occupancy sensors that optimize ventilation rates for large spaces such as the new ballroom. For more information, read Sustainability Featured in Morris Inn Renovation..

  • Dunne and Flaherty Halls

    Opened August 2016
    (144,094 combined GSF)
    LEED Gold Certified

    In the fall of 2016, Dunne Hall became home to 221 undergraduate men and Flaherty Hall became the home of 226 undergraduate women. When the University designed and constructed Flaherty and Dunne halls, it carefully planned and implemented green methods for saving energy, water and other resources and generating less waste in both the construction and operation of the two buildings. Compared to other newly constructed buildings, Flaherty Hall and Dunne Hall each consume 28 percent less energy for heating and cooling, which contributes to a healthier, more sustainable environment. For more information, read Flaherty and Dunne halls earn LEED Gold certification..

  • McCourtney Hall

    Opened August 2016
    (217,930 GSF)
    LEED Gold Certified

    With the goal of earning LEED Gold certification, the architects implemented sustainable building practices from concept to completion, sourcing 33 percent of the building materials from the local region and using more than 32 percent of materials with recycled content. The University repurposed 5,954 tons of asphalt millings, and diverted 108 tons of paper and cardboard from landfills. For more information, read Notre Dame earns LEED Gold certification for McCourtney Hall.

  • Harris Family Track & Field Facility

    Opened Spring 2017
    (10,600 GSF)
    LEED Silver Certified

    The new home for the Fighting Irish track & field teams includes several team support areas and features many sustainable features which continue to highlight the University's efforts to build better, more efficient and sustainable facilities. The project included automatic lighting controls and LED lighting fixtures, resulting in the building using 34 percent less energy for interior lighting and 65 percent less energy for exterior lighting than current building code requires. For more information, read LEED Silver certification awarded for Harris Family Track & Field Stadium..

  • Jenkins and Nanovic Halls

    Opened Summer 2017
    (185,500 GSF)
    LEED Silver Certified

    Because of the installation of high-efficiency heating and cooling systems, the building consumes 16 percent less energy and uses no CFC-based refrigerants, which contributes to a healthier, more sustainable atmosphere. Additionally, temperature controls in offices and workstations and all multi-occupant spaces efficiently regulate heating and cooling. For more information, read Jenkins and Nanovic Halls earn LEED Silver certification..

  • Duncan Student Center, Corbett Family Hall and O’Neill Hall

    Opened Summer 2017
    (830,000 combined GSF)
    LEED Gold Certified

    The University earned 60 credits in nine categories including the use of sustainable materials and resources, water efficiency, energy, innovation in design and indoor environmental quality, among several other areas. Throughout the construction of the project, more than 20 percent of the building materials consisted of post-consumer and pre-consumer recycled content and more than 20 percent of materials were manufactured or harvested regionally. For more information, read Notre Dame earns LEED Gold for Duncan Student Center, Corbett Family Hall and O’Neill Hall..

  • Walsh Family Hall of Architecture

    Opened January 2019
    (97,232 GSF)
    LEED Silver Certified

    Walsh Family Hall of Architecture earned a total of 55 points from the USGBC (U.S. Green Building Council) Located in the basement level of the building lies one of the control centers for the geothermal well systems on campus, providing heating and cooling to the Walsh Family Hall of Architecture and the Johnson Family Hall. The construction of the building emphasizes economy while maximizing the architectural character in keeping with the values of sustainability for the long-term life of the building. For more information, read Notre Dame receives LEED certification on five new buildings..

  • Baumer Hall

    Opened August 2019
    (78,000 GSF)
    LEED Gold Certified

    Energy-efficient initiatives along with LED lighting being installed throughout the building provide a projected annual energy savings of 294,194KwH. The University earned 60 credits in seven categories with sustainable sites, energy & atmosphere, and indoor environmental quality providing the majority of those points. The large, open area surrounding the building allows for a diverse green space providing year-round visual interest as well as recreational and social areas for students. For more information, read For more information, read Notre Dame receives LEED certification on five new buildings.

  • Irish Athletics Center

    Opened Fall 2019
    (111,400 GSF)
    LEED Silver Certified

    Utilizing the key function of the building, the project achieved an innovation credit called Design for Active Occupant which puts access on transparent glazing throughout the facility, clear and easy access to all floors, and an actively used stair that draws usage to it in lieu of the elevator upon entry. Almost 88% of the construction material was recycled, and the project is projected to save more than 32% of water. For more information, read Notre Dame receives LEED certification on five new buildings..

  • New Corby Hall

    Opened Spring 2020
    (71,000 GSF)
    LEED Silver Certified

    Earning 50 points from the USGBC (U.S. Green Building council), the rebuilt Corby Hall was created to provide a more sustainable home for the Holy Cross community for the next 150 years. The original structure was built in 1895. An underground parking garage allows for larger grass and landscaping areas and better storm water management around the building site. A new HVAC system replaced old window-unit air conditioners, helping contribute to the overall energy-efficiency of the project. For more information, read Notre Dame receives LEED certification on five new buildings..

  • Johnson Family Hall

    Opened August 2020
    (68,000 GSF)
    LEED Gold Certified

    The USGBC (U.S. Green Building Council) awarded 61 points for the many LEED features incorporated into the project. A reduction of almost 43% in indoor water use, a 22.8% savings in energy and a diversion of 1,812.56 tons of waste from the landfill, are just a few sustainability initiatives incorporated into the building project. For more information, read Notre Dame receives LEED certification on five new buildings..